Items filtered by date: July 2024

Achilles tendon injuries are prevalent among people who engage in physical activities, from athletes to casual exercisers. The Achilles tendon, which connects the calf muscles to the heel bone, is critical for movements like standing on toes and propelling forward when walking or running. Common injuries include Achilles tendinopathy, which involves tiny tears from overuse and results in pain, swelling, and morning stiffness. More severe Achilles tendon injuries, such as partial or complete tears, cause sudden, sharp pain, swelling, and difficulty pointing the foot down or standing on tiptoe. A podiatrist can diagnose these injuries through a physical exam, ultrasound, X-rays, or MRI scans to assess the extent of damage. Treatment depends on the injury's severity. Mild cases may be managed with rest and stretching exercises, while severe tears might require surgery and immobilization with a cast or brace. If you are experiencing pain resulting from an Achilles tendon injury, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for an exam, diagnosis, and treatment options.


 

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Barbara Davis of Gilbert Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Gilbert, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, poses significant challenges for foot health, stemming from restricted blood flow to the lower extremities. This condition, often caused by atherosclerosis, involves the buildup of fatty deposits in the arteries, leading to narrowed or blocked blood vessels. The diminished blood supply to the feet can result in various symptoms, including pain, cramping, numbness, and weakness, particularly during physical activity. Left untreated, PAD can contribute to serious complications such as foot ulcers, infections, and delayed wound healing. Diagnosing PAD typically involves a comprehensive evaluation by a podiatrist. This process includes a thorough medical history review, assessment of risk factors such as smoking and diabetes, and a physical examination focused on evaluating circulation in the legs and feet. Specialized diagnostic tests, such as ankle-brachial index, or ABI measurement, Doppler ultrasound, and angiography, may also be employed to confirm the diagnosis and determine the extent of arterial blockages. If you are experiencing any of the foot symptoms mentioned above, it is suggested that you consult a podiatrist who can accurately diagnose and offer relief solutions for PAD.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Dr. Barbara Davis from Gilbert Podiatry. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Gilbert, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Wednesday, 10 July 2024 00:00

Are Bunions Affecting Your Everyday Life?

Have you noticed a bony protrusion on the side of your big toe? If so, you may have developed the foot condition known as a bunion. Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

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Tuesday, 09 July 2024 00:00

Diabetes and Foot Wound Healing

Diabetes significantly impacts wound healing, particularly in the feet, due to high blood sugar levels that impair circulation and immune response. Diabetes is a chronic condition where the body cannot regulate blood sugar properly, leading to various complications. In diabetics, poor blood circulation reduces the delivery of oxygen and nutrients essential for healing, while neuropathy, or nerve damage, diminishes the sensation, making it harder to notice injuries. As a result, even minor foot wounds can progress to serious ulcers or infections if left untreated. Foot wounds in diabetic patients often occur due to friction, pressure, or minor trauma, exacerbated by poorly fitting shoes or neglect. To prevent and treat these wounds, maintain proper foot hygiene, inspect feet daily for injuries, and manage blood sugar levels rigorously. Wearing well-fitted shoes and avoiding walking barefoot can also help prevent injuries. If you have diabetes and have persistent wounds or complications, it is strongly suggested that you consult a podiatrist. These healthcare providers specialize in diabetic foot care, providing tailored treatment and preventing severe outcomes.

Diabetic foot care is important in preventing foot ailments such as ulcers. If you are suffering from diabetes or have any other concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Barbara Davis from Gilbert Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Diabetic Foot Care

Diabetes affects millions of people every year. The condition can damage blood vessels in many parts of the body, especially the feet. Because of this, taking care of your feet is essential if you have diabetes, and having a podiatrist help monitor your foot health is highly recommended.

The Importance of Caring for Your Feet

  • Routinely inspect your feet for bruises or sores.
  • Wear socks that fit your feet comfortably.
  • Wear comfortable shoes that provide adequate support.

Patients with diabetes should have their doctor monitor their blood levels, as blood sugar levels play such a huge role in diabetic care. Monitoring these levels on a regular basis is highly advised.

It is always best to inform your healthcare professional of any concerns you may have regarding your feet, especially for diabetic patients. Early treatment and routine foot examinations are keys to maintaining proper health, especially because severe complications can arise if proper treatment is not applied.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Gilbert, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Swollen feet and ankles are a common issue with a variety of causes. Injuries such as sprains or fractures can lead to immediate swelling due to tissue damage and inflammation. Diseases, including heart, liver, or kidney problems, can cause fluid retention, leading to swelling in the feet and ankles. Infections, especially in individuals with diabetes or compromised immune systems, can also result in swelling in these areas. Certain medications, such as those for blood pressure or hormonal therapy, can cause fluid retention and swelling as a side effect. Pregnancy often leads to swollen feet due to increased body fluid and pressure from the growing uterus. Edema, the medical term for fluid buildup in tissues, can be caused by prolonged standing, sitting, or underlying health conditions. If your feet or ankles have become swollen, it is suggested that you visit a podiatrist who can determine what the reason is, and offer appropriate treatment remedies.

Swollen feet can be a sign of an underlying condition. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Barbara Davis of Gilbert Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Swollen feet are a common ailment among pregnant women and people who stand or sit for extended periods. Aging may increase the possibility of swollen feet and patients who are obese often notice when their feet are swelling too. There may be medical reasons why swollen feet occur:

  • Phlebitis - A condition that causes the veins to become inflamed and can also cause leg pain.
  • Liver disease - This may lead to low blood levels of albumin which is a protein. This can cause fluid in the blood to pass into the tissues and several areas of the body can become swollen.
  • Heart failure - When the heart doesn’t pump properly the blood that is normally pumped back to the heart can pool in the veins of the legs causing swollen feet.
  • Kidney disease - One of the main functions of the kidneys is releasing excess fluid in the body. This type of condition can make it difficult for the kidneys to function properly, and as a result the feet may become swollen.
  • Deep-vein thrombosis (DVT)- This is a serious condition where blood clots form in the veins of the legs. They can block the return of blood from the legs to the heart which may cause the feet to swell. It is important to be treated by a podiatrist if this condition is present.

Swollen feet can also be caused by bone and tendon conditions, including fractures, arthritis, and tendinitis. Additionally, there may be skin and toenail conditions and an infection may cause the feet to swell. Patients who take medicine to treat high blood pressure may be prone to getting swollen feet. 

Many patients elevate their feet to help relieve the swelling and this is generally a temporary remedy. When a podiatrist is consulted the reason behind the swelling can be uncovered and subsequently treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Gilbert, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.


 

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