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March 2019

Monday, 25 March 2019 00:00

Exercises May Help Morton’s Neuroma

A swollen nerve in the foot may be indicative of a condition that is referred to as Morton’s neuroma. It is described as a growth of nerve tissue that exists between the third and fourth toes.This ailment may cause adjoining tendons and ligaments to put pressure on the nerve, which may cause inflammation and pain. Additional symptoms may include numbness or tingling, and some patients may experience a burning sensation. Pain and discomfort are often felt in the bottom of the foot, near the base of the third and fourth toes. There may be effective exercises that can be performed, which which may aid in improving strength in the arch of the foot. These may include stretching the lower leg, and the plantar fascia, which is the tissue that runs along the bottom of the foot. If you feel you have Morton’s neuroma, it is suggested that you schedule a consultation with a podiatrist who can guide you toward the proper treatment.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Barbara Davis of Gilbert Podiatry. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Gilbert, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Morton's Neuroma
Published in Blog
Monday, 18 March 2019 00:00

Potential Dangers of Wearing High Heels

Many women choose to wear high heels to enhance the lines of the legs and feet. Research has shown there may be disadvantages to wearing this type of shoe, which may include potential damage to different parts of the foot. If you have a bunion, it may become worse while wearing high heels. This may be a result of limited room in the toe area of the shoe, which may put excess pressure on the toes. Many patients experience ingrown toenails from wearing high heels. This may be due to having inadequate room for the toes to move freely in. Additionally, the risk of falling may increase from wearing high heels, and this may lead to other painful conditions. If you would like additional information about how high heels affect the feet, please consult with a podiatrist.

High heels have a history of causing foot and ankle problems. If you have any concerns about your feet or ankles, contact Dr. Barbara Davis from Gilbert Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Effects of High Heels on the Feet

High heels are popular shoes among women because of their many styles and societal appeal.  Despite this, high heels can still cause many health problems if worn too frequently.

Which Parts of My Body Will Be Affected by High Heels?

  • Ankle Joints
  • Achilles Tendon – May shorten and stiffen with prolonged wear
  • Balls of the Feet
  • Knees – Heels cause the knees to bend constantly, creating stress on them
  • Back – They decrease the spine’s ability to absorb shock, which may lead to back pain.  The vertebrae of the lower back may compress.

What Kinds of Foot Problems Can Develop from Wearing High Heels?

  • Corns
  • Calluses
  • Hammertoe
  • Bunions
  • Morton’s Neuroma
  • Plantar Fasciitis

How Can I Still Wear High Heels and Maintain Foot Health?

If you want to wear high heeled shoes, make sure that you are not wearing them every day, as this will help prevent long term physical problems.  Try wearing thicker heels as opposed to stilettos to distribute weight more evenly across the feet.  Always make sure you are wearing the proper shoes for the right occasion, such as sneakers for exercising.  If you walk to work, try carrying your heels with you and changing into them once you arrive at work.  Adding inserts to your heels can help cushion your feet and absorb shock. Full foot inserts or metatarsal pads are available. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Gilbert, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Why High Heels Are Not Ideal for Healthy Feet
Published in Blog

Patients who experience foot pain may recognize the benefit of wearing custom-made orthotics. They are defined as inserts that are placed inside the shoe, and may help to provide the support that is needed for daily activities. They may also be effective in correcting abnormal walking patterns,  in addition to relieving pressure on a specific part of the foot. There are several foot conditions that may benefit from the use of orthotics. These may include bunions, plantar fasciitis, high arches, or rheumatoid arthritis. If you have any type of foot pain, it is strongly suggested that you seek the counsel of a podiatrist who can discuss treatment options, and properly fit you for custom-made orthotics.

If you are having discomfort in your feet and would like to try orthotics, contact Dr. Barbara Davis from Gilbert Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Are Orthotics?

Orthotics are inserts you can place into your shoes to help with a variety of foot problems such as flat feet or foot pain. Orthotics provide relief and comfort for minor foot and heel pain but can’t correct serious biomechanical problems in your feet.

Over-the-Counter Inserts

Orthotics come in a wide variety of over-the-counter inserts that are used to treat foot pain, heel pain, and minor problems. For example, arch supports can be inserted into your shoes to help correct overarched or flat feet, while gel insoles are often used because they provide comfort and relief from foot and heel pain by alleviating pressure.

Prescription Orthotics

If over-the-counter inserts don’t work for you or if you have a more severe foot concern, it is possible to have your podiatrist prescribe custom orthotics. These high-quality inserts are designed to treat problems such as abnormal motion, plantar fasciitis, and severe forms of heel pain. They can even be used to help patients suffering from diabetes by treating foot ulcers and painful calluses and are usually molded to your feet individually, which allows them to provide full support and comfort.

If you are experiencing minor to severe foot or heel pain, it’s recommended to speak with your podiatrist about the possibilities of using orthotics. A podiatrist can determine which type of orthotic is right for you and allow you to take the first steps towards being pain-free.

If you have any questions please contact our office located in Gilbert, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Ankle Foot Orthotics for Athletes
Published in Blog
Monday, 04 March 2019 00:00

Symptoms of Rheumatoid Arthritis

The medical condition that is referred to as rheumatoid arthritis is often accompanied by specific symptoms. These may include pain, stiffness in different areas of the foot, or swelling. Additionally, many patients may feel feverish, or have an overall sense of fatigue. This may be a result of how this autoimmune disorder may affect the overall body. There are treatment options that exist, which may bring a mild form of relief. Some patients benefit by wearing shoes that are comfortable, or using orthotics, which may be helpful in relieving excess pressure. If you are noticing any of these symptoms, and would like a proper diagnosis, it is suggested to consult with a podiatrist who can offer correct treatment techniques.

Because RA affects more than just your joints, including the joints in your feet and ankles, it is important to seek early diagnosis from your podiatrist if you feel like the pain in your feet might be caused by RA. For more information, contact Dr. Barbara Davis of Gilbert Podiatry. Our doctor will assist you with all of your podiatric concerns.

What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder in which the body’s own immune system attacks the membranes surrounding the joints. Inflammation of the lining and eventually the destruction of the joint’s cartilage and bone occur, causing severe pain and immobility.

Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Feet

Although RA usually attacks multiple bones and joints throughout the entire body, almost 90 percent of cases result in pain in the foot or ankle area.

Symptoms

  • Swelling and pain in the feet
  • Stiffness in the feet
  • Pain on the ball or sole of feet
  • Joint shift and deformation

Diagnosis

Quick diagnosis of RA in the feet is important so that the podiatrist can treat the area effectively. Your doctor will ask you about your medical history, occupation, and lifestyle to determine the origin of the condition. Rheumatoid Factor tests help to determine if someone is affected by the disease.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Gilbert, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Rheumatoid Arthritis in the Feet
Published in Blog
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